2014 Articles

Designboom:

http://www.designboom.com/art/leif-maginnis-spins-artstrobe-with-pulsating-ultraviolet-light-02-05-2014/

Professional Lighting Design:

https://pld-m.com/artstrobeus-von-leif-maginnis/?lang=en

Neatorama:

http://www.neatorama.com/2014/01/25/ArtStrobe-Interactive-Light-Art/#!wjwJE

WP


Wired Magazine

By Philippa Warr
10 February 2012
Wired Magazine

With so much whirring, clunking, tapping, thrumming and pulsing, it’s easy to feel a little overwhemed at Kinetica Art Fair. When you’re not being offered a transcendent light experience you’re being instructed to spin handles and press buttons on mysterious-looking contraptions. In order to ease you in and flag up some fabulously inventive artworks which caught our eye, here’s Wired.co.uk’s hitlist for Kinetica attendees.

Leif Maginnis
Maginnis specialises in interactive electronic light art — in this case a series of spinning fluorescent carousels which can be manipulated with two knobs — one for colour and one for speed. By indulging in a spot of knob twiddling each viewer creates their own personal viewing experience with minute shifts of the dial producing dramatic changes in the wheels’ appearance. (Not so great if you’re prone to travel sickness, though.)

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Creative Review Magazine

By Eliza Williams
10 February 2012
Creative Review Magazine

Presenting a mixture of Heath Robinson-esque contraptions and high-tech interactive works, the Kinetica Art Fair returns to London this weekend, celebrating artists who create works using light, sound, robotics and electronics…

At the high-tech end of things, there is a beautiful series of hypnotic spinning light displays by Leif Maginnis (still of one shown top), that you can speed up or slow down by twiddling a knob on the screens.

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Don’t Panic Magazine

By Jack Sharp
12 February 2012
Don’t Panic Magazine

We head along to Kinetica Art Fair, where science and robotics meets art, to meet a face-stealing robot.

Leif Maginnis’ work is also particularly captivating, and is based on the stroboscopic effect of fluorescent-coloured objects moving under ultraviolet strobe lights. In darkened room, Leif has arranged a number of rotating circular screens, each one fitted with two knobs. On the dart board-like screen, colours spin causing a strobe effect. Attendees turn the two knobs, thereby changing the speed of the rotation and brightness of the ultraviolet light. The purpose of the piece, as explained by Leif himself, is to hopefully evoke a state of trance in the viewer, much like watching a fire.

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